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Top Facility & Property Management Trade Shows and Expos in 2020

Top Facility & Property Management Trade Shows and Expos in 2020

Trade shows give industry professionals the chance to learn about emerging technologies in their field, network, and test out new products before buying. For facility and property managers, the 2020 trade show season looks particularly promising. Don't miss:

IFMA's Facility Fusion

April 14-16, 2020 | Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA

IFMA's Facility Fusion combines local, global, individual, and industry-wide facility management solutions into the trade expo of the year. Roughly 800 companies from 46 states and 20 countries attend, bringing with them their expertise in improving efficiency, increasing productivity, and industry trends. Attendees will get to take part in tours that offer a practical look at new building upgrades and cutting-edge energy-efficient technology. You'll save hours upon hours in independent research, and return to your facility armed with new solutions and ready to take on any issues that come your way. To find more information or register to attend, please the IFMA website.

Cincinnati Facilities Maintenance Expo

February 13, 2020 | Oasis Conference Center, Cincinnati, OH

This expo brings in professionals ranging from facility and property managers, owners, and plant engineers, to maintenance workers, buyers, and more. Exhibitors get the benefit of a large near-captive audience to display their products to; attendees get to learn about the latest developments in cleaning equipment, concrete and roofing restoration, waste disposal products, lift equipment, HVAC, and energy-saving. Can't make it to Cincinnati? Be sure to attend the Indianapolis Facilities Maintenance Expo on March 12, 2020, at the 502 East Event Center, in Carmel, IN.

Connex

April 20-22, 2020 | Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center, Orlando, FL

Connex doesn't just give buyers and industry professionals the chance to network, it also allows attendees to attend education and power sessions, hear keynote speeches from top names in facility and property management, and win prizes. Exhibitors cover everything from roofing and pavement maintenance, to security, to snow management, to fire suppression and safety. Located at the beautiful Gaylord Palms Resort & Convention Center, it's one expo that you'll regret missing. Visit their website to find more details, a list of exhibitors, and registration information.

PM Grow Summit 2020

May 27-29, 2020 | AT&T Executive Education & Conference Center, Austin, TX

Like its name implies, PM Grow is dedicated to fostering growth and improvement in property management. It brings the most forward-thinking property managers and other industry professionals together to share new technology and best practices, and develop new solutions to the biggest challenges facing facilities today. You'll be able to get actionable suggestions from world-class thought leaders to help expand your portfolio, generate leads, and build a devoted customer base. Talk to the industry's leading professionals today, and learn where it's heading tomorrow. Visit the PM Grow Summit 2020 website to learn more, or to take advantage of their early bird registration.

The National Facilities Management and Technology Conference and Expo

March 17-19, 2020 | Baltimore Convention Center, Baltimore, MD

NFMT is jam-packed with networking events and parties, as well as opportunities to get hands-on experience with the latest technology and services from established names in the industry and emerging brands. With over 125 different educational sessions available to attendees, you are guaranteed to find something that piques your interest and helps you meet your facility's unique challenges. Visit the NFMT website for more exhibitor details and registration information.

Northeast Buildings & Facilities Management Show & Conference

June 12-13, 2020 | Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, Boston, MA

NEBFM attracts professionals and exhibitors from a wide range of facility types, including hospitals, schools, municipal buildings, malls, hotels, manufacturing facilities, transit facilities, religious buildings, and more. It features over 2,500 attendees, 250 exhibitors, and an educational conference with 22 talks covering sustainability, maintenance, construction, and renovation. Details are still to be determined, but please visit the ProExpo website for updates and more information.

The Green Industry & Equipment Expo

October 21-23, 2020 | The Kentucky Exposition Center, Louisville, KY

For property managers who are tasked with handling landscaping duties, the GIE+EXPO is a can't-miss event. It's the industry's largest expo for lawn and garden products, outdoor machinery, and large-scale lighting and landscape equipment used by the nation's top landscaping crews. Attendees will get to enjoy indoor and outdoor exhibits, as well as a free concert, with over 1000 exhibitors on the Kentucky Exposition Center's unique 20-acre facility. Their new products spotlight showcases new developments from turf mowers, to the Titan HydroSeeder, to high-output lights and fluid systems. Attendees are urged to dress comfortably -- there's a lot of ground to cover. Please visit the GIE+EXPO website for more details and registration information. Property and facility managers face new challenges with every change in the seasons, let alone the issues that can arise with implementing new standards and technology. Don't let your business be left in the dust -- attend the country's top trade shows to network with other professionals, learn about emerging tech, and discover how to improve your workplace and expand your client roster.

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Most Common Tenant Complaints and How To Resolve Them

Most Common Tenant Complaints and How To Resolve Them

For facility and property managers, tenant relationships can often be tricky to navigate, and this is never truer than when dealing with tenant complaints. Laws regulating landlord and tenant rights can be complicated, and not something either party wants to find themselves on the wrong side of. Fortunately, the most common tenant complaints are fairly simple to resolve, with a little effort.

1. HVAC

Whether it's the biting cold of winter or the dog days of summer, temperature control is a top priority for tenants. This can be tough to manage in older buildings, where aging heating and air conditioning systems may create challenges in keeping buildings within a safe temperature, let alone comfortable.

Property managers should have strategies in place to make sure HVAC systems are cleaned, serviced, and, if necessary, tested for flammable gas or carbon monoxide leaks every year. Have the contact information for an HVAC professional and relevant utility services. If a building relies on window units for air conditioning, keep a couple of spare units to allow maintenance workers to quickly switch broken units out for working ones.

2. Pest infestations

Nothing is worse than turning on the light and seeing a cockroach or rat scurrying across the floor. Unfortunately, no matter how clean a tenant keeps their space, multi-unit buildings are virtually magnets for pests. Remember: it only takes one tenant with poor housekeeping habits to attract pests to everyone.

The simplest solution is to call an exterminator immediately. Many facility managers have a standing appointment with an extermination company to keep pests away. In addition to regular spraying, encourage tenants to keep food stored in insect- and rodent-proof packaging, and have maintenance workers seal up gaps around pipes and beneath walls. These are the most common means of ingress for pests, and cutting off their way in will help avoid infestations in the future.

3. Poor communication

Many tenants complain that they don't feel listened to by their property managers or maintenance workers. This can set both landlords and tenants up for problems down the road -- unsatisfied tenants are likely to leave negative reviews of the property, warn others away from renting there, and may even resort to temporary "fixes" for problems rather than call facility management to report them. Landlords who don't communicate effectively with their tenants may find that their tenants don't follow the rules. The best fix for this is to initiate communication whenever necessary. Go over rules and expectations for the use of the property before the lease is signed, and send periodic reminders to tenants regarding property upkeep. Conduct regular inspections. Make sure that tenants are aware of how to contact facility management, and have a hotline for emergency maintenance needs.

4. Privacy

Few things are as nerve-wracking for a tenant as the idea that a landlord can enter their property at any time, and rightly so. Even good tenants generally don't like feeling barged in on for surprise inspections.

The best way to ease tenants' minds here is to follow the law -- property managers are required to provide at least 24 hours advance notice before entering a unit. A phone message or notice posted on the door may not cut it, either. Send an email with a read receipt or a certified letter, and make sure all tenants have a list of yearly inspection dates so they can feel prepared.

5. Mold

Black mold isn't just unsightly, it's toxic. For tenants with respiratory issues like asthma or COPD, it can even be deadly.

Facility managers shouldn't hesitate when it comes to dealing with black mold. When it shows up, it's often a sign of an underlying issue, like a leaking pipe or poor humidity control. Regular maintenance workers generally don't have the equipment or expertise to thoroughly and safely eradicate it, so it's best to call a mold remediation specialist to make sure that it's completely taken care of.

6. Rent and Security Deposit Disputes

Even with a good landlord-tenant relationship, problems with money can arise. Tenants may withhold rent for neglected repairs or unlivable conditions, landlords may choose to keep security deposits to cover cleaning and repair costs, and both parties may disagree about why and how much of the money was withheld.

Property management generally isn't equipped to handle this on their own. It's a good idea to have a lawyer on retainer who's well versed in landlord-tenant law, to make sure that the landlord's interests are protected and everything is dealt with fairly.

7. Eviction

Nobody likes it, but eviction is sometimes necessary. It can be a real problem with tenants who refuse to move, abandon all of their possessions, or even try to become violent.

This is another case where a little legal counsel can go a long way. There are laws governing how to go about the eviction process, as well as what a landlord is and isn't allowed to do with abandoned possessions. It might even be necessary to have the police or building security help escort a belligerent tenant from the property.

Any time money changes hands, it complicates relationships. As long as landlords are able to thoroughly communicate their expectations to tenants, tenants feel secure in reporting problems to the property manager, and complaints are dealt with quickly, they can have an easy, mutually respectful relationship.

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How to Choose a High-Quality Paint

How to Choose a High-Quality Paint

Regardless of what the application is, the paint quality you choose for your facility is important. Choosing the right paint starts with acknowledging the differences between low-quality and high-quality paints, and understanding why paint quality matters.

Disadvantages of Cheap Paint

  1. While low-quality paint may be cheaper, make no mistake that it comes with hidden costs. The pigments involved in their formulas often don’t work to enhance color and coverage, and therefore require that more than one coat be applied. This means you’ll need to purchase more cans of paint for your project.
  2. Also, low-quality paint doesn’t last very long. It simply isn’t as durable as higher-quality paint is, and will fade, crack or peel after just a few years.

Advantages of High-Quality Paint

  1. High-quality paint consists of ingredients that result in a smoother, longer-lasting application. You won’t have to worry about having to repaint every year due to regular wear, which is particularly helpful in high-traffic areas of a facility. High-quality paint formulas are specially made to hold up against fading, cracking and peeling, and in all types of environmental conditions.
  2. The pigmentation in high-quality paint is better than in low-quality paints, which means you won’t need as many coats. The better the pigments, the smaller and purer they are – which means high-quality paint offers more coverage, color, and depth to your paint job. Whether it’s an old color or imperfections you’re painting over, these pigments help the paint to more easily conceal what you want to conceal.
  3. High-quality paints include only the best binders (or resins), which help the product to adhere to every surface properly from the start, thus increasing durability. Good binders also keep paint from peeling, cracking, and blistering; fading and chalking; and from scuffing and fingerprints.
  4. Paints that are higher in quality can also protect against mildew, mold, and spoilage.

Assessing Your Project and Factors to Consider When Selecting Paint

You may be wondering, considering the many paint formulas available, how to determine which is a quality paint suitable for a given application? It’s always a good idea to start the process by looking at past performance. If you’re repainting an area, what brand and type of paint were used there before? How long did it hold up for? 

However, you’ll also want to consider that paint manufacturers often adjust their paint formulas in order to improve performance or reduce costs. So, how do you assess your project’s paint needs should that happen? There are four factors to look at to help you ensure that your paint selection is high-quality:

Factor #1: Price

While the price is not an absolute guarantee, you can trust that it is typically a good indicator of quality. Generally speaking, the higher the quality of paint, the higher its price. This is because more expensive paints tend to contain ingredients that are of better quality, and usually contain a higher volume of solids.

Factor #2: Percentage of Solids

As the paint dries and the liquid evaporates, what’s left on the surface are known as solids. The percentage of solids contained in a can of paint is in direct ratio to the thickness and quality of the protective paint film. Lower-grade latex paints will typically contain about 20-30% solids by volume and 79-80% water, while higher-grade latex paints will generally be 35-50% solids.  Keep your eye out for the latter, with the knowledge that the higher the percentage of solids is, the higher the quality of the paint is.

Factor #3: Prime Pigments

Pigments are finely ground particles that are dispensed into the paint and provide color and hiding properties. Certain pigments, known as “prime” pigments, provide better coverage. Look for paints that contain titanium dioxide; the highest quality prime pigment.

Factor #4: Concentration of Binders

You’ll want to look for paints that contain a higher percentage of binders, as the higher the percentage, the more the paint will be resistant to cracking and peeling. A pigment-volume concentrate value of 45% is considered to be the optimum level for most applications.

A Final Note

When evaluating paint options, a good rule of thumb is to remember that you can contact the paint manufacturer. They will be able to tell you anything you need to know about the paint’s formula and ingredients, be it types of pigments and binders used, percentage of solids, and what other additives it might contain.

Finally, rest assured that there are existing organizations that have developed evaluation and rating procedures for paint, and have set standard requirements for content and testing procedures that manufacturers must adhere to if their paint is to be certified as meeting that standard. These organizations include ANSI, ASTM, Green Seal, and the Master Painters Institute. For more information, you can contact these organizations with any specific questions you may have about paints you may be considering.

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Stress Management for Facility Managers

Stress Management for Facility Managers

It’s no secret that Facility Management is a stressful job full of ever-increasing demands. Every day brings new challenges, and often they are of unpredictable variety. This kind of stress is not always bad – in fact, it can be invigorating and rewarding. But to remain effective at one’s job, it’s important for facility managers to stay on top of their stress levels – and know how to cope.

To be successful in this process, there are three factors we must be sure to recognize. The first is learning to recognize stress. Then, we must learn to recognize how the ways that we perceive stress affect how we deal with it. And finally, with an understanding of the way different people respond to stress, we can learn to find the “sweet spot” where we can meet stress with confidence and produce productivity.

Factor #1: Recognizing the Ways Our Bodies Alert Us to Stress

Our bodies let us know when we are under acute stress – our palms may begin to sweat and our heart may begin to race. Respectively, these presentations benefit us if, say, we need to prepare for a firm grip or to run away from something. In other words, these bodily mechanics work in our favor for the kinds of stress that require immediate action.

However, when we are encountering chronic, repeated stress, such as the day-to-day grind of facility management, our bodies often tend to bypass this “fight or flight” response, and instead, leave us engaging a third stress-response: freezing up. Unfortunately, in business, freezing up does not make for good productivity, and certainly does not aid in the handling of tenant complaints or emergencies.

Factor #2: Recognizing How We Perceive Stress

“Eustress” is defined as moderate or normal psychological stress that gives us the adrenaline jolt we need to help us focus. In essence, it’s a type of stress that is beneficial to us. In fact, having a positive perception of stress offers our bodies a layer of protection against the negative health effects of stress.

How so? Perceiving stress as an energizing force will prevent blood vessels from too much constriction, and overall will take less of a toll on the body. Although chronic stress will still eventually have an overall negative impact on one’s brain and body, a positive perception can buy us time to face stressful challenges with less negative effects on health than if we were to perceive stress as something to be overwhelmed by.

Factor #3: Recognizing Our Differences

People react to stress differently because of personal brain chemistry, and with particular regard to dopamine. Some people need excitement to do their best work and are motivated by the stress of deadlines. This type of stress floods their brain with dopamine, and they clear it quickly, which leaves them in a focused, productive zone. On the other hand, deadlines or too many demands leave some people feeling overwhelmed and unable to focus, rendering them unable to clear their dopamine quickly, and so they become stuck in panic mode.

The good news is that along this continuum is a third scenario -- and an optimal one, at that! Research has shown that we are happiest when we are presented with intense challenges and discover that we have the capabilities to meet them. In facility management, this may be likened to being faced with a complex situation that rides just along the edge of our wheelhouse of abilities. This can force us to become completely absorbed in our work, resulting in high engagement as everything ‘clicks,’ and bringing about a feeling of being in control. Being both engrossed and confident, simultaneously, has a way of making time feel like it disappears. This phenomenon is often referred to as being “in the zone” or “in flow.” 

Takeaways

Being able to be an effective facility manager means having to face a barrage of stressors – everything from repairing unreliable building systems, dealing with occupants, a lack of budget resources, job demands changing too quickly to keep up, unreasonable expectations from higher-ups, not enough time in a day to get everything done, and a lack of work/life balance. Knowing how to recognize stress, and alter your perception so that you can meet it better, can go a long way in keeping you healthy and getting you in “the zone.” Remember, it is only when you know how to best manage your own health that you can then best manage your team and your projects.

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Hurricane Preparation Planning For Facility Managers

Hurrican Preparation Planning For Facility Managers

We all know that hurricanes are violent storms with the potential to cause severe damage and destruction to anything within their range. The good thing is, with today’s technology meteorologists are able to forecast hurricanes well in advance of their approach. Thankfully facility management can make it a point to take advantage of these insights. Advance preparation can leave facility leadership with a solid framework by which to weather the storm and protect their facilities, and the businesses and employees therein. We encourage facility management teams to refer to the following guidelines.

Assess What’s Most Important

There are three key elements that keep a business up and running: its employees, assets, and location. Taking swift action early enough to protect these elements from the threat of a hurricane will help you to maintain order and rebound quickly after the storm has passed.

Protecting Your Employees. When facing a potential crisis, an organization’s workforce looks to management for leadership and guidance to help keep them safe and informed. There are challenges to this that exist in today’s highly mobile workforce that didn’t exist even just ten years ago. Several factors to take into consideration are:

  • Where is each staff member located (in real-time)?
  • Which employees travel and what is their current schedule?
  • If you have remote workers, do you know where they are in any given moment?
  • Do you have a mass notification system in place to quickly and easily notify your people?
  • Is each employee being tracked by HR, travel, and/or building badge systems so they can be reached immediately?


Inventory Your Assets. 
The potential for flooding, high winds, gas shortages, and power shortages pose a threat to all kinds of business assets, including network, data, equipment, technology, supplies, products, and overall facilities. Identifying the following assets now can help to prevent stress later on:

  • Where are your assets located?
  • What kind of physical protection is available for each asset?
  • Which assets are critical to running the business?
  • Are these assets owned or insured?
  • What assets are leased, and what is your responsibility if they’re damaged?


Note: To help businesses “prepare for and adapt to changing conditions and recover rapidly from operational disruptions,” the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recommends referring to their Continuity Tool Kit.

Fortify Your Locations. Geographic location can certainly influence a property’s vulnerability to disaster by a hurricane. That said, while severe flooding is more likely to occur in coastal regions, facilities located inland are still susceptible to great danger. Hurricanes may weaken, but even slow-moving systems can hover over populated areas and cause catastrophic flooding and water damage. Whether your facility is comprised of a single unit or multiple buildings, you’ll need to consider how to reinforce each individual location. Consider the following questions:

  • What is the address of every location under your company umbrella including storage facilities and transportation lots?
  • What is the evacuation plan for each facility? For example entrances/exits; stairs, elevators and escalators; parking lots; and access to the closest hurricane evacuation route.
  • Which people/teams work at each location?
  • What are the biggest risks for each facility and how fortified are they to withstand potential damage?
  • What types of materials are in place necessary to getting the facility up and running again?


Draw Up an Emergency Plan

Having an emergency plan in place is vital to minimizing the panic and confusion that hurricanes can cause. Your plan should maintain some flexibility in case of unforeseen circumstances, but it should certainly incorporate core infrastructure elements that are unlikely to change as the company grows. Here’s how you can plan ahead to protect these elements:

Back-Up Your Data. To safeguard against on-premise damage, like flooding or fires which can destroy on-site servers, you’ll want to ensure that all company data is backed up offsite. Backing up data regularly should ideally become a habit so that, in the case of a hurricane or other weather event, your business won’t suffer loss should your server go down.

Set Up Cloud Systems. Cloud-based systems can expedite the disaster-recovery process. Converting key business systems and mobile device data to the cloud, including payroll, CRM, and HR systems, will allow these systems to be accessed remotely in the event your company needs to work from a different location.

Create Checklists. A checklist of tasks that need to be performed before, during, and after a hurricane can help to ensure that nothing is missed. The list should be both stored on a cloud application for easy access, and also physically posted for easy reference in the case of a power outage. Also, be sure to communicate this list to key stakeholders if you’ll be out of the office or unavailable at the time a hurricane is expected to touch down.

Review Contracts. Don’t wait for the aftermath of a major storm to review your contractual obligations with vendors, insurance providers, and landlords. Take the time to review contracts for specific mentions of weather-related events, damages, and complete loss. If a contract doesn’t reference these potential situations, contact contract owners directly to find out what their weather-related clauses and policies are.

Map Evacuation Routes. Safety is the number one priority in the event of any threat, and hurricanes certainly qualify here. An explicit plan to help employees promptly locate the safest way out of their facility will minimize chaos. You’ll need to determine which stairwells and doors should be used, identify parking lot exits, and what surrounding streets should be taken. Posting physical maps on each floor will help to familiarize your staff with approved evacuation routes. Holding drills on regular days when no weather-threats are posed will also help to acquaint employees with proper evacuation procedures.

Implement a Two-Way Communication System. It can’t be emphasized enough how important communication is. In the event of a hurricane, good communication can potentially save lives. You’ll want to ensure that every staff member is safe and able to communicate with leadership and with each other. You should not rely on the internet alone, as it can be rendered inaccessible during a power outage. Implementing emergency communication software can enable a company’s leadership to deliver real-time information to employees across multiple channels and devices simultaneously. Such a system can also be used to check in with employees for status updates, and to provide evacuation details. You’ll want to optimize this system by regularly updating your company directory with accurate contact information for each employee. Many systems include pre-set templates to help administrators pre-emptively prepare so that during a weather event they will be able to relay information swiftly with only a few clicks. Messages created in advance and stored on these templates eliminate the need to create a message from scratch, which can save precious minutes in the face of a dangerous storm. Ideal templates to use should include email, voicemail scripts, SMS texts, and push notifications.

Create Emergency Response Teams

It takes a proverbial village to protect your people, assets, and locations. Once your plan is in place, it’s time to delegate responsibilities and practice its execution. Here are three steps necessary to provide everyone with a thorough understanding of what to do in the event of a hurricane:

Define Clear Roles and Responsibilities. Your plan will have moving parts involving multiple people, so be sure to designate roles to employees you trust can handle the challenge. Communicate specific responsibilities with each individual stakeholder and ensure that they have the resources and technology they’ll need. Be clear with everyone about who is on each team, and who they can turn to for specific information.

Train Teams. Gather the team to review protocols and answer any questions they may have. Be sure to modify the plan as the company evolves should new locations be acquired, expansions be built, or facilities be changed.

Role Play. Hold mock drills to practice your plan. Though role play may feel silly, rest assured that when actually faced with the dangers of a hurricane, team members will be more likely to remember a drill than an office memo. You can opt to give the team notice, or to conduct impromptu drills to mimic a real-life emergency.

As you can see, careful planning in conjunction with these guidelines can make all the difference. Taking proactive steps now, before a hurricane hits, can help to ensure everyone’s safety in the midst of one. It will also give weather-damaged facilities accessibility to a quicker recovery process and can help protect businesses by minimizing their total losses.

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How to Prevent Slips and Falls in Your Facility

How To Prevent Slips and Falls in Your Facility

Facilities with high-traffic areas, such as schools, healthcare, and commercial facilities, are the most at risk for people taking a sudden slip, trip, or fall. According to the National Safety Council, these types of mishaps lead to the most costly types of injuries as they’re not only the leading cause of workers’ compensation claims, they also represent the primary cause of lost days from work due to an accident.

While the risk for these accidents may be increased by human factors, such as age, failing eyesight, and other mobility impairments (such as using a cane or a walker), it’s important for facility managers to note the non-human factors that reflect accident-prone statistics: floor surfaces.

Floors and flooring materials contribute to more than 2 million fall injuries per year, usually due to them becoming wet from leaks, spills, snow, rain, mud, wet leaves, and other floor contaminations. Thankfully, these issues are easily preventable with the implementation of a tight floor maintenance problem. So, while you may not be able to control the weather or how people walk, you can start by identifying problem areas in order to minimize the chance for slips, trips, and falls.

The Five “Danger Zones”

Lobbies. As a welcome space, lobby areas tend to be shiny and attractive -- but this doesn’t come without a cost. Lobbies are often buffed and waxed, in an effort to offer optimal appeal for visitors and workers. Also, as the point of entry, lobbies are often subject to shoes, umbrellas, and the debris that both track in.

Breakrooms/cafeterias. As a space where food and beverages are prepared and consumed, spills are more likely to occur. Coffee machine areas are especially susceptible to drips and spills, where occupants tend to pass through with uncovered mugs full of the hot beverage.

Restrooms. It goes without saying that wherever there is water, there is an increased risk for slips, trips, and falls. Restroom floors are subject to becoming wet in numerous ways – everything from the slightest hand-dripping, to overflowing sinks and toilets, and plumbing problems.

Piping. Corrosion and wear can cause piping to leak. Preventative maintenance is key when it comes to piping, especially if it’s in close proximity to where occupants are.

Roof. Both cold or inclement weather can make any roof vulnerable to leaks. On top of that, buckets that are left on floors to collect liquid from roof leaks are also susceptible to being tripped over by a distracted occupant.

Five Tips to Prevent Accidents

Fortunately, there are several ways that facility managers can plan ahead in order to prevent these various flooring/area hazards:

Watch the Weather. Preparation for storms, snow, rain, or any other weather event that could leave debris on your facilities’ floors is of utmost Have signs handy to make building occupants aware of potential hazards, and have floor blowers on hand to dry up rain water.

Use Matting for Liquid Absorption. Floor matting can help absorb water and other liquid debris. However, matting comes with its own set of hazards. Avoid matting that gaps, wrinkles, or easily moves around. Ideally, your matting should have an adhesive backing to keep the mat flat and in place.

Analyze Past Problem Areas. Examine any previous slip or fall claims and use them as a map to help you identify high-risk zones in your facility, or to help you determine primary areas for potential hazards. By looking at “root cause” errors of the past, you can help to ensure a safer present and future.

Use Proper Cleaning Aides. Be sure to purchase the right cleaner for the right contaminant and floor surface. For example, what you use on tile may be quite different than what you’d use on wood or concrete. Work with your janitorial supply company to determine which chemicals are best to use on the various surfaces of your facility. In addition, be sure to carefully read the directions on all chemical products in order to use these cleaners correctly. Take special note of any dilution ratios and water temperatures required.

Have a Floor Maintenance Management Program in Place. An established program is an important preparation tool for proper floor maintenance. Your program should include ways to properly store cleaning products and equipment, training staff, regular floor inspections that are shared with supervisors, and specific procedures and protocols for various areas.

Slippery flooring is unsafe for building occupants and can turn into expensive claims for your facility. Getting ahead of these potential problems can go a long way to eliminate risk, and make for an all-around safer, happier workplace for everyone.

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Facility Manager Tips For Designing and Maintaining Restrooms

Restroom Maintenance

Restrooms are an integral part of a well-run facility. Whether you're dealing with a building's employees or its clientele, everyone will need to take a bathroom break at some point in the day. Poorly designed or maintained restrooms aren't just unpleasant for people to use, they can negatively impact their perceptions of the facility itself. Don't let that happen to you -- keep these three things in mind when you're dealing with bathrooms.

1. Standardize, standardize, standardize.

Nothing is worse than having to use a restroom that doesn't have adequate supplies. When fixtures aren't standardized across an entire facility, it can make it more difficult for staff to keep things adequately stocked. Toilet paper, paper towel, and soap dispensers should all be of the same type, so you won't have to worry about staying on top of ordering refills for multiple different makes and models. This will also help save money over the long run, by allowing you to order large quantities at a bulk rate.

2. Plan for traffic.

When it comes to designing restrooms, the biggest mistake you can make is to fail to take traffic into account. Some finishes may be attractive, but not durable enough to hold up to heavy use without beginning to look worn and shabby. Corian, for example, is becoming a popular choice for partitions due to its durability over metal or composite. Placing groups of restrooms in high traffic areas allows them to be serviced by a centrally-located supply closet. If space allows, restroom plans an even allow for a maintenance corridor that will let facility employees perform regular maintenance without cluttering up high-traffic hallways.

3. Keep them bright (but not too bright).

No matter how well-maintained a restroom may be, poor lighting will make it look dirty and dated. Lighting that is too bright will make it unpleasant for users, as well as wasting power. Choose energy-efficient bulbs and ballasts -- standard fluorescent ballasts typically use 14-16 watts, while energy efficient electronic ballasts use as little as 8 -- and set up an automated lighting system. This will ensure that lights are only on when they're needed, and don't waste power when they aren't. Place fixtures in areas where they'll be easy to access, and avoid choosing spots where they will be partially blocked by door or partitions.

Keeping restrooms clean.

Do you know what maintenance employees have to say about cleaning public bathrooms? 80% consider it a difficult job and cite a lack of time and too much foot traffic as the biggest contributing factors -- two things that can be mitigated by proper planning. The scary part here is that restroom maintenance consists of both cleaning for looks, and cleaning for safety. An overwhelming majority of cleaning professionals (94%) claim to rely on product use information to train their employees, but 15% of those same employees say that a lack of training makes their jobs more difficult, and nearly 70% of professionals say that their staff doesn't understand disinfection or sanitization. A simple wipe-down might be enough to keep a countertop or faucet looking clean, but is it really enough to make it hygienic?

To keep public bathrooms really clean, it's vital that facility managers develop their own training and standard procedures, and train their employees in basic disinfection and sanitization best practices. Coupled with bathrooms designed with cleanliness and ease of maintenance in mind, this alone should be enough to make sure restrooms say looking fresh and hygienic while cutting down on the public health risks posed by restroom germs.

People generally don't spend more than a few minutes at a time in the bathroom, but those few minutes can create a big impression. By choosing durable finishes, locating bathrooms where they can be easily reached for maintenance, and making sure employees have the tools, supplies, and knowledge they need to keep them sanitized and well-stocked, facility managers can make sure that their restrooms always look and feel their best.

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Colleges With The Best Facilities Management Programs

Colleges With The Best Facilities Management Programs

Facility managers play a crucial role in the organization, safety, and function of a commercial building. Given their importance, facility managers remain in great demand in numerous industries. People who want to enjoy long facilities management careers can pursue the training they need at any of the top colleges that are known for their facilities management degree programs. 

Career Outlook for Facilities Management

The outlook for facilities management careers is healthy and growing. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts the career itself to grow by 10 percent by the year 2026. Moreover, job market experts expect facilities management to be vital to a wide array of industries like:

  • Environmental services
  • Healthcare and social services
  • Technician and scientific services
  • Finance
  • Insurance
  • Governmental operations


People who earn a facilities management degree will learn vital skills that will make them invaluable to these and other industries. Some of the skills an FM degree will encompass include:

  • Communication
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Environmental stewardship
  • Fire safety
  • Financial management
  • Business management
  • Quality assurance
  • Property management
  • Building security
  • Cleaning
  • Building operations


These skills are a few that will be learned during the course of earning a facilities management degree. They give students the foundation needed to work in facilities management careers.

Top Colleges with Facilities Management and Planning Degree Programs

A number of colleges across the U.S. offer degree programs in facilities management. Most of the programs are offered at the undergraduate level and are relatively small. It is not unusual for colleges with this program to graduate anywhere from six to 20 students in it each year.

These are a few of the colleges that offer facilities management programs for students:

Southeast Missouri State University. Southeast Missouri State University is located in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. It offers three undergraduate facilities management programs. It graduates on average six students with this degree each year. The average in-state tuition for Southeast Missouri State University is a little over $600 per year. Out-of-state students can expect to pay around $11,000 per year. Books average around $$500 while on-campus room and board cost $8000 on average.

Brigham Young University. Brigham Young University is found in Provo, Utah. It has an undergraduate facilities management program that graduates around 15 students each year. The average tuition cost for in-state and out-of-state students both is around $5000 a year. Books cost around $800 a year while room and board averages around $7000 yearly.

Rochester Institute of Technology. Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York costs both in-state and out-of-state students around $36,000 per year in tuition. It offers both an undergraduate and graduate degree program in facilities management. Books for this program cost around $10,000 a year. Students who want to live on campus can expect to pay on average $11,000 per year.

San Diego State University. San Diego State University is found in San Diego, California. It is a large university with one undergraduate facilities management program for students. Its tuition rate for in-state students is $5000 while out-of-state students can expect to pay upwards of $16,000. Books for the program cost around $1000. Room and board averages around $1500 per year.

Madison Area Technical College. Madison Area Technical College in Madison, Wisconsin offers a facilities management undergraduate degree. Tuition for the program costs around $4000 for in-state students and $6000 for students who come here from out-of-state. Students also can expect to pay around $1700 a year for books and materials.

Sinclair Community College. Sinclair College is located in Dayton, Ohio. As a community college, students in facilities management do not have the option of living on-campus. However, their tuition will average around $3000 for in-state students and $6000 for out-of-state students. Books will cost them around $1000 a year.

CUNY NY College of Technology. CUNY NY College of Technology is located in Brooklyn, New York. It has a single facilities management program for undergraduate students. Out-of-state students pay $!5,000 a year for tuition while in-state students pay $6000. Books cost around $1300 yearly.

These colleges are a few that offer degree programs in facilities management. They teach the skills students know to become effective and valuable facilities managers in the near future. They prepare people to join the rapidly growing facilities management industry.

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Networking Tips For Long Island Facility Managers

Networking Tips For Log Island Facility Managers

Sometimes, being an effective and successful facility manager isn't just about what you know -- it's who you know. Networking with others in one's field is an important part of many careers, and facility management is no different. If you've been reluctant to get out there, here are six reasons why you should strongly consider giving it a try:

1. You can find new potential employees.

"Always be recruiting" is an important management strategy. It never hurts to know skilled, talented individuals in your field. If you ever find yourself in need of a new hire, networking with other facility managers gives you an additional resource for obtaining word-of-mouth recommendations for good employees. You'll know you're getting the best talent in the business.

2. It'll save you from reinventing the wheel.

Networking gives you the opportunity to see how different processes or products work in other contexts and circumstances. It's an opportunity to learn from other industry professionals who might have already gone through the same challenges your workplace is dealing with, and gain valuable insight into how you can tackle them better. It's always good to keep your knowledge of trade secrets up-to-date, and learning how other managers get things done is a great way to do that.

3. You'll make valuable allies.

It can be difficult to feel like every decision ultimately rests with you. If you make the wrong choice, your decisions can dramatically impact how your workplace functions. Going to IFMA Long Island meetings, meeting other managers, and making friends gives you a list of people you can contact when you have questions or problems and could use some advice -- or even just a friendly ear from someone who understands your industry.

4. You'll stay current.

Facility management is an ever-evolving field. Employee health and safety, environmentally-friendly products, methods of automation, and energy management solutions are just a few of the areas that advances in technology are continuing to shape. Networking not only helps you keep abreast of these changes, but it can also show you how other facility managers are implementing them to their best advantage. You'll not only stay on top of the safest, most effective, most efficient ways of keeping your facilities running smoothly, but you'll also know what you need to do to keep yourself attractive to potential clients.

5. You can scope out your competition.

Making friends and finding valuable contacts are key parts of networking, but it serves another purpose, too -- it lets you see what the most successful managers are doing right. If your portfolio could use a little expanding, it behooves you to observe how the leaders in your industry work and figure out what you can do to emulate them. You'll also be able to learn about the different challenges facing managers of larger facilities or portfolios, so you won't be left dealing with "growing pains" as your business expands. 

6. It'll broaden your perspective.

Facility management is a very broad field. Having a hospital as a client is a whole other ballgame when compared to managing a university's campus or shopping mall. Even within the same sector, large facilities operate differently from small ones, and those in urban areas don't experience the same things as rural ones. Networking gives you a chance to see how other managers operate in their chosen areas of expertise and gain valuable perspective and insight into your profession. 

In the professional world, networking is just part of business. By going to IFMA Long Island meetings, you can meet other facility managers that are local to you. Even if you've never attended a networking event before -- whether online or in person -- meeting and getting to know other leaders in your industry can only help you. They'll be able to offer you valuable knowledge, strategies of implementing new products and processes, a wider recruitment pool, and a broader perspective.

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The Many Benefits of Ground Maintenance

The Many Benefits of Ground Maintenance

It may be easy to discount mowing, raking, pruning, and other upkeep of your commercial property as irrelevant and unimportant chores. However, it actually does have critical consequences for your building. You may commit yourself fully to high-quality lawn care by discovering how it benefits your Long Island building’s appearance, safety, and cost efficiency.

Increased Revenue

Having a well-kept landscape for your Long Island business can significantly increase its revenue and profitability. In fact, one study showed that effective lawn care can increase rental rates in a commercial building by as much as seven percent. Further, respondents to the survey reported being willing to spend as much as 10 percent more on products and services if a building in Long Island and elsewhere had high-quality tree canopies and other landscaping features.

Moreover, people surveyed about how important landscaping is to where they shop or do business at responded that would be willing to travel greater distances to businesses that had well-kept properties. They also would spend more time at these commercial districts if the properties were well groomed and visually appealing.

Reduced Heating and Cooling Costs

Effective landscaping can also make a significant impact on your building’s utility costs. During the summer, for example, you may spend thousands of dollars keeping the building at a cool and constant temperature. However, the sun and heat streaming in through windows can make your efforts more challenging during the hottest times of the year.

When you plant and maintain trees that can grow and provide shading to the building, you provide a natural barrier against the heat and sunlight. The shade from the trees can help keep the building’s interior cooler during the hottest months of summer. In turn, you spend less money on air conditioning bills.

Likewise, well thought out landscaping can keep your building warm in the winter. Shrubs planted along the bottoms of windows and along the foundation can keep heat in during the cold winter season. Vegetation planted strategically along the bottom level of the building can act as insulation when the weather is at its coldest.

Improve Safety

Vegetation like shrubs, flower beds, and small trees can also provide a safety barrier for your commercial property. When you plant them under and along the windows on the building’s ground level, you make it more difficult for burglars and trespassers to break into the building. They may be unable to climb over the vegetation to breach the windows and gain access to the business. 

Along with installing a security alarm for your building, you can also discourage break-ins by planting strategic vegetation like cacti, flowering shrubs, and thorn bushes under and along windows. Trespassers may decide the effort is not worth the risk of breaking into the business.

Improve Mental Health

Attractive landscaping can also improve the mental health of people who work or do business within the building. Studies have shown that visually appealing gardens significantly reduce stress levels in people. It also improves health outcomes of patients who can see these gardens from the windows of hospitals, doctors’ offices, and other medical facilities. 

Given the positive impact of beautiful landscaping on people’s mental health, facilities managers have seen an increased demand for gardens for hospitals and healthcare facilities. FMs can play a key role in lowering stress, anxiety, and other negative emotions in people who visit their buildings. 

Noise Reduction

Finally, practical lawn care can reduce the amount of noise that comes in and out of your building. Trees, shrubs, and flower beds can absorb noise pollution and prevent it from going into the building or out into the neighborhood. When noise levels are a concern, you can effectively minimize them by planting vegetation like trees, shrubs, and more around your commercial property.

As a facilities manager, you have the responsibility to maintain your property’s lawn and garden areas. You can appreciate this task even more by realizing the positive impact it has on numerous facets of your building.

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