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Facility Managers and Their Role in an On-Site Emergency

Facilities Management Emergency Response

While many facilities managers prefer to maintain a behind-the-scenes role in the buildings they oversee, there are times when your role becomes critically important. In an emergency, FMs must take charge. You know the space better than anyone, and are able to summon resources quickly and get people where they need to go.

The best emergency response comes from thoughtful preparation. In an emergency, the facility manager defines everyone’s role so they know what to do when the moment arises. It is his or her responsibility to define mission-critical functions and assess where vulnerabilities lie. The FM coordinates all of the parts of the preparedness plan that is in place for your facility; communicating that plan to all owners, managers and occupants; and running practice scenarios to identify breakpoints in the plan. The FM takes into account new circumstances, the changing needs of building occupants, and feedback from stakeholders to tweak the plan as needed.

How Facility Managers Can Best Prepare for an Emergency

The most important key to a successfully implemented building operations plan is preparation. All emergencies, from fires to natural disasters to terrorist attacks, can cripple a facility’s operations. It is vital that your facility management staff create a thorough emergency plan.

An emergency plan should cover four key issues:

It should identify the critical building systems that must be kept functional. There are state and federal regulations and standards that address the minimum basic requirements needed for communication, emergency power, water, fire protection, fuel storage, HVAC, and lighting systems. Covered under these requirements are the safety needs of the employees, residents and visitors of the facility. Keep in mind that these requirements do not necessarily cover the services many facilities will face after an emergency has occurred.

It should include a list of everyone who occupies the building on a regular basis. Maintaining a comprehensive list of anyone and everyone you can reasonably expect will be in your facility during an emergency. Include contact information, a cell phone number and a work email, so you are able to reach them if need be. Facility managers have an obligation to ensure the safety of everyone in their facilities.

It should have a list of all equipment and other property that needs to be secured safely. Items such as computer equipment, outdoor furniture, and lawn-maintenance tools must all be properly stored in an emergency. Dedicate this responsibility to one team member to avoid confusion and a breakdown in communication which can cost precious time in an emergency situation.

It should include a checklist for every action the facilities team needs to carry out during the emergency. As noted above, it is important that every member of your team knows exactly what their duties are in a crisis. Your emergency checklist should be prominently displayed in your facility’s staff room. It is also a good idea to have a few laminated copies of your emergency plan in various central spots in your building.

Improving Your Facility’s Emergency Preparedness

The best way to prepare for an emergency situation is to perform a mock disaster run-through every quarter. This can be anything from a natural disaster such as tornadoes or earthquakes, hurricanes, to a potentially life or death situation such as a terrorist threat or a potentially violent individual in the facility. Choose a scenario and act it out, having everyone involved role-play their own part. After the mock-crisis is over, evaluate your team.

  • How calm did your team remain in the face of this crisis?
  • How well did they gather the facts? Was any relevant data missed that would have aided you in your decision-making?
  • What decisions did you make and how effective where they?
  • What was your team’s reaction time?
  • Using a scale of one to five, how well did you rank in each of the above?
  • How well did your crisis plan work? What impact did it have on employee morale and/or the public’s image of you?

These trial runs will test your team’s ability to recover from unexpected events and highlight any flaws or weaknesses in your plan. It is also important to routinely check the maintenance and functionality of your property’s safety equipment such as sprinklers and alarms, and designing workspaces so that people can freely move to get to an exit.

Create a command center. Devote a space in your facility or off-site that is crisis-ready. Equip the room with supplies such as televisions, phones and computers. This is where your crisis team will gather to discuss developments, stay informed and devise your company’s response. Be sure everyone involved is aware of this space.

It is important that facilities managers communicate to occupants well ahead of time what they need to do in the event of an emergency. Make sure this information gets disseminated to everyone. Many building occupants report that they are not aware of the location of safety equipment or procedures. They believe that their workplaces are unprepared for power outages and natural disasters and they are unsure who to report to with a safety question or concern.

IFMA-Long Island Platinum sponsor Total Fire Protection has performed fire and life safety services for numerous corporate and government clients across the United States. Their professional technicians have decades of experience keeping facilities of all types and sizes up to code and ensuring that tenants are kept safe. They pride themselves in developing lifelong relationships with their clients and partners. Total Fire Protection offers, new and existing customers, comprehensive cost-benefit analysis for their fire and life safety services. In a dire situation, Total Fire Protection will dispatch our emergency response team 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Your team’s reaction in an on-site emergency can have a drastic effect on the outcome of the situation. If handled properly, the occupants and staff of your facility will emerge from the disaster unscathed and with a deepened level confidence in your management ability.

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Is it Time to Upgrade Your Long Island Property’s HVAC System?

long Island hvac system replacement

This is the time of year when most Long Island properties are in the lull between the need for heat and the need for air conditioning. That being said, it will soon be time to turn on your building’s central air conditioning system.  If you are planning to repair or replace your HVAC units or furnaces, now is the time. But do you know if it makes more sense to replace aging units or just maintain them for another season?

With regular maintenance, most commercial HVAC systems last between 15-20 years. If your system is close to the end of its lifespan, it may make financial and logistical sense to upgrade your property’s units. A scheduled replacement is much less difficult to deal with than having to close your building for an extended period of time because you waited until it stopped working to replace it. When you schedule a replacement, you can prepare the tenants in your building(s) and may not even have to close your building, depending on the time of year and the weather.

There are close to five million commercial buildings in the United States today.  Some of these facilities were built or upgraded in recent years with the latest in technology and systems for occupant comfort and convenience, but many others still rely on outdated technology in their HVAC systems.

Commercial buildings consume just over 30 percent of the energy produced in the United States. Heating and cooling costs account for 40 percent of a commercial building’s total electricity bill. Building managers are always looking for ways to cut costs. Some of the greatest cost-cutting opportunity lies with the HVAC system, a property’s biggest energy user and highest controllable expense. Local utility companies throughout the country offer rebates and other business programs that will subsidize and facilitate commercial energy efficiency systems, further reducing the installation expenses associated with an upgrade.

In the next few years, the HVAC systems that were installed in the 1990s will be reaching their end of life. As your building’s equipment ages, maintenance and operating costs increase and reliability decreases.  Today’s heating and cooling systems have made substantial advances in design and efficiency, so facilities managers can look forward to significant operational benefits if they upgrade some or all of the building’s HVAC system.

How Do You Decide Whether to Make Repairs or Replace Your HVAC Units?

One way to know if replacement is the right choice is to check your furnace’s annual fuel utilization efficiency rating (AFUE). This number measures how efficient your unit is in converting fuel energy into heat. The higher the rating, the more efficient it is. For example, an 80 percent AFUE rating on a gas furnace means 20 percent of the heating will escape out the chimney or elsewhere.

The general rule of thumb is: If annual repair costs are more than 10 percent of what it would cost to replace the unit, you may as well replace it. A 10 percent return on capital is a solid return in today’s environment—especially if you’re able to invest in something far more efficient.

According to information from the Department of Energy, replacing an older furnace or boiler with a high efficiency unit, together with upgrades to flues, vents and other systems, can cut energy consumption in half. This is a big improvement over older, low-efficiency systems that log AFUE ratings of only 56 to 70 percent.

If you do decide to switch out your units, be sure to let your accountant know. IRS MACRS rules require that landlords depreciate HVAC units and furnaces in residential properties over 27.5 years. Most units will not last that long, so you will want your accountant to know that you are upgrading out this capital equipment so they can work with you to claim accelerated depreciation when you replace the old units. If you decide to repair instead of replace, you will also see some benefits, as repair costs are generally fully deductible in the current tax year.

Installing a high efficiency HVAC system allows you to effectively manage energy consumption, leading to better indoor air quality, lower costs, and a reduced carbon footprint. Along with regularly scheduled preventative maintenance, your high efficiency HVAC system can actually lower your total energy consumption by up to 50%. During peak summer months, your new system can save you a minimum of 15 percent off of your utility bill, potentially freeing thousands of dollars to allocate elsewhere. When making the decision whether to repair or replace your HVAC system, carefully weigh the pros and cons and consult with your building’s facility maintenance team to determine the most appropriate course of action.

Contact IFMA-Long Island bronze sponsor, Kelair, Inc. for all of your industrial and commercial HVAC needs.

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Mail Management in Today’s Work Landscape

Mail Management

There was a time when sorting and delivering a package or letter was as easy as pushing a mail cart throughout your building. Employees worked in offices or other dedicated work spaces and maintained a specific and consistent schedule. Most often, the parcel was handed directly to the recipient at their desk, or, at worst, left with their secretary or co-worker.

Today, employees rarely spend all of their time at the office. Studies report that approximately 60% of employees now work outside the office at least part of the time. Job-sharing, telecommuting and multiple office locations have led to a much more chaotic and frenzied work atmosphere. ‘Remote work’ is booming.  And whether they’re working from home, a favorite coffee shop, a coworking space, or somewhere else entirely, it is apparent that the 9-to-5, 40-hour work week is gone. And it’s not coming back.

Ensuring that important mail gets delivered on time to the right person is more difficult now than ever. Luckily, there are resources available to help facility managers streamline the mail delivery process. Here are three steps to successfully execute mail delivery as the workplace and mail management landscapes progress concurrently with technology.

Implement Mobile Tools

In order for your mail delivery system to be successful, your team must be equipped with the right tools for the job. That means supplying your mail staff with barcode scanners and mobile applications to create a more efficient and reliable mail cycle.

Barcode scanners digitize incoming mail data and enable mailroom employees to sort and track each piece of mail faster and more easily. Mobile apps that can easily be downloaded to cellular phones or other handheld devices easily capture signatures, dates and timestamps in real time as mail travels from source to recipient. This allows building personnel to deliver mail with greater efficiency, accountability and visibility.

Computerize the Mail Management Process

Mail management software has made it simple for organizations to automate tasks such as data entry, item indexing, storage, routing, tracking and sending receipts. There are many software options available for facility and building managers to choose from. This software can send an automatic email notification to the employee letting them know they need to retrieve their package, cutting down on the time team members spend tracking down mail recipients.

Facilities can also install kiosks to assist recipients with mail retrieval. Streamlining the mail distribution process will help ensure prompt and proper delivery in spite of the challenges of a mobile workforce.

Utilize Digital History to Combat Mail Delivery Issues

Prior to the development of mailroom software, undelivered or misplaced packages caused a headache that often required a substantial time commitment to solve. Thanks to current technology, well-equipped mailrooms are able to keep a record of every move a piece of mail makes from arrival to delivery.

Automation apps monitor each step that a package or letter takes in real time. If an item fails to reach its destination, FM’s have the ability to track its history and determine its location. Real-time monitoring also helps mailroom personnel provide specific and accurate delivery estimates.

Today’s business landscape is both complicated and dynamic. Facilities managers are facing greater challenges than ever before. Adapting to our client’s needs requires flexibility and foresight. Fortunately, technology is leading the change, offering heightened knowledge and mobility. With the right tools in place, we have the power to improve efficiencies on an organizational and individual level, establishing ourselves as industry leaders in the process.

By following the suggestions above, you can create a mail delivery system that is efficient and adaptable. Your team and your customers will benefit from greater consistency and accountability, a reduction in human error, lower operational costs and the peace of mind that comes with knowing the job is being done right.

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Six Important Skills for Facility Managers

Important Skills For Facility Managers

The field of Facilities Management is one that asks a lot of those who work in it. As facility managers, you are expected to wear many hats. The responsibilities that fall on FM’s are significant, and they require a variety of skill sets. It goes without saying that a facility manager should be a skilled and experienced maintenance person, and should have a strong knowledge of industry standards for operational elements like energy efficiency, sustainability and construction. But the list of skills necessary to successfully manage a facility goes well beyond the obvious resume bullet points.

It is difficult to narrow down all of the strengths and skills that are in demand in the FM marketplace. These are six aptitudes and abilities that will empower you to be a productive facility manager.

1. Strong People Skills

First and foremost, Facilities Management is about the people you serve. Your ability to connect with, engage, and motivate those around you will greatly impact your performance as an FM. Facility managers must communicate regularly with their employees and work with others to make sure the job gets done. Managers must be able to clearly explain the task at hand to different people at all levels in an organization, from subordinates to executive leadership.

Whether it is replying to tenant complaints or managing personnel issues among maintenance staff, facility managers need to be as good with people as they are with tools. Respect is paramount in every successful working relationship. Communicating effectively with your staff means listening as much as you talk. Don’t just convey information. Make sure your meaning is understood and, in turn, make sure you understand others as well. Identify the objectives of the people you work with and make it a priority to build a professional connection that encourages each person to reach their highest potential.

2. A Capacity to Lead the Team

Facility Managers often double as Project Managers. It is commonplace for an FM to work alongside a designated PM. Whatever the task at hand may be, the buck stops with you. It is up to you to motivate your workforce, monitor performance, set goals, and measure results.  As an FM, it is your job to communicate the importance of professionalism and time management to everyone on the team. This will include directing your crew to other tasks to reduce bottlenecks or finding replacements in case of no-shows.  If your contractors aren't of the mindset that their deadlines affect the other members of the project, they need to be convinced.

3. Information Technology Know-How

FMs may not have a formal background in IT, but in today’s world, facility management is more technology-reliant than ever. The more quickly you familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of technology, the more valuable you will be in your field. Everything from time sheets to asset monitoring and facility maintenance is managed on the computer. IT plays an invaluable role in the way FMs communicate with their workforce, customers, and coworkers as well.

Your employer will look to you as the expert in facility management software. For this reason, it is imperative that you educate yourself on the latest developments to keep your facility on solid technological ground. Keep apprised of the latest trends in FM software updates and check regularly to make sure your IT platforms are situated to solve problems and eliminate waste.

4. A Go-with-the-Flow Attitude

Flexibility is an extremely valuable characteristic for FM’s. Your employees will look to you to see how you navigate difficulty situations. Are you generally easygoing, or are you naturally “on edge”? If you appear overwhelmed or stressed out, your staff will follow your lead.

The field of FM is ever-changing. Each day is different, and problems pop up without warning. Part of going with the flow means keeping cool in an emergency. Emergencies of any kind are far from uncommon when managing a facility. Whether it's responding to a burst pipe or addressing a budget that doesn't match up with expected figures, the best facility managers are the ones who are able to keep a cool head in the face of any unexpected problem and work toward a solution. If you have never faced a true emergency, you might not know how you may respond. Some people panic; others become instinctively solution-oriented and level-headed. As a general rule, it is always best to stay “cool and collected”, even the direst emergency.

5. An Eye on Sustainability

Sustainability continues to trend not only as a buzzword but also as a corporate value all around the world. That’s especially true in the facilities sector. The benefits of sustainability and green building practices in facility management are well established. Reduction in energy consumption, productivity increases, and waste reduction are just a few of the beneficial effects of sustainability. A sustainable building is a win-win for any company.

Successful and sustainable building operation and proper maintenance requires everyone on staff to take an active interest in preserving the life of the building and improving its efficiency. Your employer will count on you to keep your facility as green as can be. Make sustainability a goal and take proactive steps toward it.

6. An Aptitude for Networking

The most successful FM’s realize they can’t possibly know it all. Whether you have a deep knowledge of a particular area or a broad base of general knowledge, you must rely on experts or your professional network to quickly and easily find out about products, services, technology, techniques and tools. Networking isn’t just about socializing or trying to find the next job. It is a way for facility managers to surround themselves with resources that, at some point, will solve a problem, find resources or provide advice about an issue.

In facilities management, the physical workspace intersects with almost everything that happens inside it. FMs need the ability to network laterally across the entire organization with IT, HR, administration, and other executives. Make an effort to network with colleagues outside of company meetings. Attend trade shows and conferences. Join a professional organization. Network with suppliers and contractors. Join industry-related groups on social media platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Connecting with and talking to others about a problem usually leads to a better solution than solving it alone.

Facility managers oversee the numerous aspects of building management with a goal towards ensuring that all elements come together seamlessly. While the day-to-day tasks of facility managers can vary from operations and maintenance to project planning and management, the number one priority of FM’s is to make sure the facility functions effectively and efficiently. Surround yourself with trained, experienced colleagues and constantly strive to establish and maintain the highest level of customer satisfaction.

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Spring Maintenance Tips for Facility Managers

Spring Maintenance Tips For Facility Managers

It’s hard to believe it, but spring has finally arrived. The recent snowstorms have kept much of the Northeast stuck in the doldrums of winter. Despite the lingering snow on the ground, it is time to think about the upcoming warmer weather and the spring cleaning that comes with it. What can facility managers and building owners do to prepare their property and grounds for the new season?

It is a very smart idea to be proactive and begin thinking about sprucing up your facility. A well-cared-for building is the best way to promote your property. It also ensures your tenants safety. Here are some tips to help you review your maintenance program for the coming year.

1) Make the Best First Impression

When people arrive at your building, the first thing they notice are the grounds. It is a no-brainer to do all you can to give a good first impression before they even walk in the door. Whether you have a contract with a formal landscaper or you handle your buildings lawn and flower maintenance yourself, now is the time to plant seasonal flowers. Flowers will make the right impression. Greenery inside your building will also create a welcoming environment. Ask your facility services provider about grounds beautification, maintenance, and potted plant care. 

2) Spring Walkthrough

This is the time to search your property for any issues. Catching small problems now before they become big ones is an important role of a facility manager. Addressing small details can go a long way towards improving the aesthetics and functionality of your space. Ask your janitorial company and/or handyman to complete the walk through with you, focusing on details you might normally overlook. Some things to inspect for repair/replacement are: doors (door sweeps, door stops, sticking locks, etc.), corner guards, tile and grout, light switches and face plates, ceiling tiles, countertops and shelving, cabinets and hinges, and fire extinguishers. Additionally, a fresh coat of paint and new caulking will make your entire space look fresh and clean.

3) Refresh the Restrooms

Daily cleaning is a necessity for public restrooms. However, periodic deep cleaning is essential for keeping your toilets, sinks, floors and bathroom stalls looking clean and functioning optimally. Dirt and germs inevitably build-up over time, and must be attacked by sanitizing all restroom surfaces, fixtures, and floors. Do mirrors need to be replaced, sinks re-caulked? Are repairs/replacements necessary for toilet paper and hand towel dispensers or baby changing stations? Pay attention to the comments made by occupants about restrooms and perform your own walk-through’s periodically to ensure nothing has been overlooked.

4) Service Air Conditioning Units

Set up a maintenance appointment with your HVAC service provider to give A/C units a thorough spring check-up so they will cool efficiently when the hot weather comes. Coil cleaning can not only boost operating efficiency but can also improve indoor air quality, which keeps everyone healthier. The air conditioning unit has been sitting unused all winter, causing dirt and sludge build-up — which, in turn, means odors, allergens, increased operating costs, and even degradation or possible failure of the unit. Preventive maintenance this spring will keep everyone happy this summer.

5) Tend to Floors and Carpets

Winter is harsh on flooring. Spring is the time to deep clean all carpets, tile and wood floors in your building. Call in a commercial carpet cleaning company to shampoo your carpets. This will refresh them and reduce any allergens. Wait until the worst of the spring pollen is gone, and then have your carpets cleaned according to Carpet and Rug Institute guidelines. Stripping and waxing will extend the life of your hard surfaces. Schools should also schedule the annual maintenance of their gym floors for the summer break. Wood floors usually require light grit screening followed by cleaning and application of a solvent-based gym finish to protect the floor and keep it shining.

The warmer weather can make spring the perfect time to give new aesthetic life to your facility. If you haven’t yet incorporated sustainable products into your facility, talk to an expert who can help you begin with simple changes that will make big differences. At a minimum, your cleaning program should use Green Seal certified chemicals and/or bio-based cleaning alternatives. To further enhance your results, you can incorporate supplies and equipment, such as recycled paper towels, microfiber cloths and mops, Carpet & Rug Institute-certified vacuums, touchless soap and towel dispensers, and automatically flushing toilets. Sustainability programs can be cost neutral when considering all of the proven economic and health benefits they provide.

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Fighting Germs in Your Facility

Fighting Germs in Your Facility

Each year, somewhere between 5% and 20% of the population will come down with the flu, and around 200,000 people will be hospitalized because of the virus. Health epidemics such as these cost the U.S. economy billions of dollars per year. 

Fighting infection is crucial to maintaining workers’ personal health, as well as the company’s financial health. Illnesses occur year-round, but certain illness-causing germs, like the common cold and influenza, peak during the winter months when we spend more time indoors in close quarters. In the United States, flu season typically stretches from November to April, peaking in January or February.

The CDC reports that 80% of illness-causing germs are spread through touch, which makes cleaning and disinfecting a critical part of preventing illness and outbreaks. Here are some ways that your staff can keep germs at bay.

Thoroughly Clean Public Areas

Frequently touched surfaces like handrails, doorknobs, and keypads are the most common ways to spread germs. Stair railways, faucets, phones, and elevator buttons should also be disinfected. Conference tables should be wiped down before each meeting. Tables and chairs will also need to be cleaned on a regular basis. These public spaces are easily overlooked, but they can be an easy way for viruses and germs to spread through a facility. Wipe out potential virus hangouts by wiping them down with alcohol-based cleaners and disinfectants often. Cutting corners when cleaning gives germs free reign to continue to grow.

There are sneaky ways that the flu virus can spread around your building. It is imperative that building managers and staff frequently check ventilation and HVAC systems to make sure they are clean and free of debris. It is also highly recommended that your cleaning crews vacuum with HEPA filters to help keep air clean.

Remind staff to check the outside areas around cooling towers and drains and on the roof for pools of water, which can collect pathogens that then travel into your building through ventilation systems. Another hidden area that it is important to clean regularly is bathroom exhaust fans. Make sure that the fans are working correctly and are pushing containments and polluted air out, and not sending them further into the restroom.

Choose the Right Disinfectant

Not all disinfectants and antibacterial sprays have the same effect and work across the board. Did you know that there is a difference between cleaning and disinfecting? Cleaners physically remove germs with soap and water or detergent, but don't necessarily kill germs. Disinfectants kill top-layer germs, but don't necessarily clean the area. A combination of both - clean first then disinfect - is the best method for reducing the risk of the infection spreading.

 Select products with labels that claim to kill bacteria and viruses like influenza and rhinovirus - the leading cause of the common cold. Always refer to the product label and follow the manufacturer's instructions for use and contact time, or the length of time the disinfectant needs to remain wet on the surface to properly kill germs. It is vital that regular cleaning and disinfecting takes place for the most effective protection from the flu. Luckily, the flu virus is not very hardy. The CDC reports that the virus can only live and remain infectious for 2 to 8 hours. Regular cleaning and disinfecting will help keep the flu at bay.

Promote Hand Washing & Provide Hand Sanitizer

Office common areas, such as break rooms and conference rooms, are at increased risk for harboring cold and flu causing germs because they are high access areas where employees come together and likely share and spread germs. Cleaning surfaces, such as countertops and tabletops, and break room appliances, such as microwaves and refrigerator handles, with sanitizing wipes drastically reduces potentially harmful germs and bacteria count. Reducing germs is a group effort, so make it as easy as possible for building occupants to keep facilities clean.

Install hands-free antibacterial hand gel dispensers throughout the facility. Post signs that remind patrons to regularly wash hands. The CDC calls clean hands the most important factor in preventing the spread of germs. Educate all employees on the importance of proper hand washing. Post reminders in restrooms for employees and visitors alike. Make sure that hand soap and paper towels are readily available in every public and employee restroom. It is a good idea to post additional signs by pools, hot tubs and saunas that discourage users from jumping in if they have open scrapes or cuts.

These easy tips make a big difference in fighting germs and staying healthy. Step your germ-fighting game up a notch by establishing a comprehensive cleaning plan, choosing the right cleaning product for your facility and involving everyone in germ prevention.

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Smart Sensors Will Bring Facilities Management Into a New Era

Long Island Smart Buildings

New technologies mean that complete building automation is coming sooner than most think. These innovative developments will usher in a new era for facility management, allowing large scale networking and digitization to manage commercial buildings.

The impact that the Internet of Things on the facility managment industry is wide sweeping. It will allow the delivery of a whole new range of solutions and services to facility managers that are revolutionary in their application.

A recent article from Facility Executive explains that "smart sensors" installed throughout modern buildings will aggregate data that will help FMs manage their spaces with mush greater efficeincy.

"The digital transformation in commercial buildings has already started and is gaining momentum. Facility managers will be among the first to benefit from the IoT revolution in driving down operating costs while improving safety and security. As smart sensors are key enablers for building intelligence, the process of identifying and selecting the proper sensors is critical. New types of smart sensors, with compelling advantages, are emerging and deserve special attention."

To read more on the subject, head over to Facility Executive's website to read the complete article.

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Pest Control Tips For Your Long Island Property

Pest Control Long Island

It’s critical to take control of potential pest issues on your property proactively and to eliminate unwanted rodents and insects before the problem becomes serious.

The first step in limiting the pests that can annoy your tenants is to stay up to date on the pest issues that are common on Long Island. Talk to your fellow facility and property managers to discuss what’s been “bugging” them since all pest problems are regional in nature. Its very common for a property to get hit by the same infestation as neighboring building.

A recent article from the facilitiesnet website explains:

"Once you have an idea of the season’s big pest, do some basic research on “how to get rid of Pest X.” This simple effort can help you prepare for these pests before they damage your property or annoy your tenants. If you’re not entirely sure of the pest you’re seeing, visual guides are available on many insects and rodents, allowing you to ID the pest on your own"

For more insight on how to keep mice, ants and other pests away from your properties, read the full article on the facilitiesnet website.

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HVAC System Fires On The Rise: What You Need To Know

HVAC Maintenance Long Island

The primary job of all facility, property, and energy managers is to keep their buildings' occupants safe. In January 2017 there have been no less than six reports of fires related to faulty HVAC systems. The silver lining to these bad reports is that none of these incidents led to any serious injury or death.

However, these fires have raised the question of what facility professionals can do to ensure their properties' HVAC systems are safe and operating properly. If your maintenace is overdue, this post is a reminder to have your system inspected to make sure its is not only running efficiently, but also safely.

For specifics on these recently reported HVAC files, read the complete article on the Energy Manager Today website.

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