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Six Important Skills for Facility Managers

Important Skills For Facility Managers

The field of Facilities Management is one that asks a lot of those who work in it. As facility managers, you are expected to wear many hats. The responsibilities that fall on FM’s are significant, and they require a variety of skill sets. It goes without saying that a facility manager should be a skilled and experienced maintenance person, and should have a strong knowledge of industry standards for operational elements like energy efficiency, sustainability and construction. But the list of skills necessary to successfully manage a facility goes well beyond the obvious resume bullet points.

It is difficult to narrow down all of the strengths and skills that are in demand in the FM marketplace. These are six aptitudes and abilities that will empower you to be a productive facility manager.

1. Strong People Skills

First and foremost, Facilities Management is about the people you serve. Your ability to connect with, engage, and motivate those around you will greatly impact your performance as an FM. Facility managers must communicate regularly with their employees and work with others to make sure the job gets done. Managers must be able to clearly explain the task at hand to different people at all levels in an organization, from subordinates to executive leadership.

Whether it is replying to tenant complaints or managing personnel issues among maintenance staff, facility managers need to be as good with people as they are with tools. Respect is paramount in every successful working relationship. Communicating effectively with your staff means listening as much as you talk. Don’t just convey information. Make sure your meaning is understood and, in turn, make sure you understand others as well. Identify the objectives of the people you work with and make it a priority to build a professional connection that encourages each person to reach their highest potential.

2. A Capacity to Lead the Team

Facility Managers often double as Project Managers. It is commonplace for an FM to work alongside a designated PM. Whatever the task at hand may be, the buck stops with you. It is up to you to motivate your workforce, monitor performance, set goals, and measure results.  As an FM, it is your job to communicate the importance of professionalism and time management to everyone on the team. This will include directing your crew to other tasks to reduce bottlenecks or finding replacements in case of no-shows.  If your contractors aren't of the mindset that their deadlines affect the other members of the project, they need to be convinced.

3. Information Technology Know-How

FMs may not have a formal background in IT, but in today’s world, facility management is more technology-reliant than ever. The more quickly you familiarize yourself with the ins and outs of technology, the more valuable you will be in your field. Everything from time sheets to asset monitoring and facility maintenance is managed on the computer. IT plays an invaluable role in the way FMs communicate with their workforce, customers, and coworkers as well.

Your employer will look to you as the expert in facility management software. For this reason, it is imperative that you educate yourself on the latest developments to keep your facility on solid technological ground. Keep apprised of the latest trends in FM software updates and check regularly to make sure your IT platforms are situated to solve problems and eliminate waste.

4. A Go-with-the-Flow Attitude

Flexibility is an extremely valuable characteristic for FM’s. Your employees will look to you to see how you navigate difficulty situations. Are you generally easygoing, or are you naturally “on edge”? If you appear overwhelmed or stressed out, your staff will follow your lead.

The field of FM is ever-changing. Each day is different, and problems pop up without warning. Part of going with the flow means keeping cool in an emergency. Emergencies of any kind are far from uncommon when managing a facility. Whether it's responding to a burst pipe or addressing a budget that doesn't match up with expected figures, the best facility managers are the ones who are able to keep a cool head in the face of any unexpected problem and work toward a solution. If you have never faced a true emergency, you might not know how you may respond. Some people panic; others become instinctively solution-oriented and level-headed. As a general rule, it is always best to stay “cool and collected”, even the direst emergency.

5. An Eye on Sustainability

Sustainability continues to trend not only as a buzzword but also as a corporate value all around the world. That’s especially true in the facilities sector. The benefits of sustainability and green building practices in facility management are well established. Reduction in energy consumption, productivity increases, and waste reduction are just a few of the beneficial effects of sustainability. A sustainable building is a win-win for any company.

Successful and sustainable building operation and proper maintenance requires everyone on staff to take an active interest in preserving the life of the building and improving its efficiency. Your employer will count on you to keep your facility as green as can be. Make sustainability a goal and take proactive steps toward it.

6. An Aptitude for Networking

The most successful FM’s realize they can’t possibly know it all. Whether you have a deep knowledge of a particular area or a broad base of general knowledge, you must rely on experts or your professional network to quickly and easily find out about products, services, technology, techniques and tools. Networking isn’t just about socializing or trying to find the next job. It is a way for facility managers to surround themselves with resources that, at some point, will solve a problem, find resources or provide advice about an issue.

In facilities management, the physical workspace intersects with almost everything that happens inside it. FMs need the ability to network laterally across the entire organization with IT, HR, administration, and other executives. Make an effort to network with colleagues outside of company meetings. Attend trade shows and conferences. Join a professional organization. Network with suppliers and contractors. Join industry-related groups on social media platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Connecting with and talking to others about a problem usually leads to a better solution than solving it alone.

Facility managers oversee the numerous aspects of building management with a goal towards ensuring that all elements come together seamlessly. While the day-to-day tasks of facility managers can vary from operations and maintenance to project planning and management, the number one priority of FM’s is to make sure the facility functions effectively and efficiently. Surround yourself with trained, experienced colleagues and constantly strive to establish and maintain the highest level of customer satisfaction.

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